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GALA DINNER SERIES

Speakers Bureau | Artwork

How we started:
In the early 1990's the Foundation held luncheons to honour the Foundation’s MMFF Annual Award recipient. In 1999 the decision was made to move from the luncheon structure to a Gala Dinner with the assistance of a volunteer Gala Dinner Cabinet. This first year, the Gala continued to honour its MMFF Award recipient but now introduced a dinner theme and speaker. From this point on, there would be two events: one celebrating the MMFF Award, traditionally held in the spring close May 26 the Patrons Birthday, and the other a Gala Dinner showcasing a speaker and theme held in the fall, during November Family Violence Prevention Month.
The Dinner Theme
A dinner theme was seen as a mechanism of linking the speaker to the issue. The first theme “Creating a Family Friendly Corporation” was instrumental in expanding the traditional audience of single ticket buyers to include the business community as corporate sponsors. A dynamic speaker would be critical to garner corporate support. Annette Verschuren, a maritimer and CEO of Home Depot delivered in spades as she highlighted the Home Depot business plan which focused on achieving the bottom line through investing in its people by creating family friendly work environments.

Further proof of the power of stewardship and the value of being a good corporate citizenship, was the 1999 MMFF Award recipient The Body Shop of Canada who continue to work towards the elimination of family violence.

The Speaker’s Bureau
With hopes of continuing the Gala Dinner concept grew a speaker’s bureau: speakers who would deliver a quality message on the issue of family violence, dynamic presenters, sharing their expertise and making the connection to family violence education, prevention and awareness.

This listing is compiled with input from Lifetime members, current and past board members, and community and business partners. Ideally, the bureau tries to book speakers for future Gala Dinners. The development of a pool of speakers is always growing in response to current societal issues.

The Location
Starting up, the Dinners had been held in Fredericton. However, the event has since moved to other locations across the province to meet several needs: to create a greater profile of the Foundation; to increase ticket sales, create new City and School Base Chapters; but perhaps most importantly to provide broader access to the speaker and the message.

The Working Model
The Foundation recognized the value in hosting outside the Fredericton area where the Foundation’s head office is based. This effort however would require local voices and champions from the community site. To strengthen this approach, a co-chair model was developed which adopted: a fixed MMFF chair and a rotating community chair from the community where the event was being hosted.

Honourary Touch
The creation of the Honourary Chair position was the finishing touch to the Gala concept. The Honourary Chair brings a heightened regard and appreciation for the speaker, guests and valued sponsors. A VIP Sponsor’s Reception is held by the Honourary Chair providing recognition to financial and in kind corporate support for the Gala event.

The Gala Team
The template model for the Gala Team is comprised of: the Honourary Dinner Chair, the Co-chairs, the Speaker, a Provincial Ticket strategy with sales zones in Fredericton, Moncton and Saint John, a Dinner Theme committee, a silent auction committee and the Sponsorship VIP reception committee. This dynamic team is supported by the President and Foundation office.

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Speakers Bureau

Theo Fleury - 2012

Margot Franssen - 2009

Beverley McLachlin - 2007

Kim Pittaway - 2005

Sally Armstrong - 2003

Pamela Wallin – 2002

Cynthia Trudell – 2000

Annette Verschuren – 1999

Theo Fleury
2012 Dinner Theme "Playing with Fire"

Theo Fleury
Theo Fleury

Theoren Fleury is a former NHL All-Star, Stanley Cup winner and Olympic Gold Medalist. Recently, Theo fascinated readers with his #1 bestseller, “Playing With Fire”.

Theoren Wallace "Theo" Fleury (born June 29, 1968) is a Canadian former professional ice hockey player for the Calgary Flames, Colorado Avalanche, New York Rangers, and Chicago Blackhawks of the National Hockey League (NHL), Tappara of Finland's SM-liiga, and the Belfast Giants of the UK's Elite Ice Hockey League. He was drafted by the Flames in the 8th round, 166th overall, at the 1987 NHL Entry Draft, and played over 1,000 games in the NHL between 1989 and 2003.

Now he is one of the country’s most in-demand keynote speakers. He shares funny stories behind the scenes with the game’s biggest stars. Theo tells jaw-dropping anecdotes of living hard at the top of the NHL, the crash that followed, and finally his comeback and redemption. Theo knows what it takes to become a champion, build a strong team and overcome incredible odds. His presentations entertain, motivate and inspire.

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Margot Franssen, O.C.
2009 Dinner Theme “Following in Muriel’s Footsteps: Driving Social Change”

Margot Franssen, OC - 2009
Margot Franssen, OC - 2009

Margot Franssen is one of the most innovative and passionate communicators in Canada. In 1980, she co-founded The Body Shop Canada, creating a company recognized for its ethical business practices and its commitment to promoting positive self-esteem and “Profits with Principles.”

Well before major marketers appreciated the value of grassroots profile building, Margot and her team used innovation to achieve high level brand recognition. “Be bold, be daring, be different, be caring,” she advised. “That’s the formula for a successful business.”

Since 1984, Margot has been working to help STOP Violence Against Women with the Canadian Women’s Foundation. Under her guidance The Body Shop of Canada raised more than $1.3 million for violence prevention and recovery programs.

In 1995, she received the Grand Award from the United Nations for effectively addressing an issue of vital concern to the world. “I feel we are responsible for driving social change, not merely responding to it,” she says.

In 2004, Margot sold The Body Shop of Canada and devoted her time exclusively to co-chairing the Canadian Women’s Foundation and serving on the board of the Women’s College Hospital. She co-chairs the Endowment Campaign for the Canadian Women’s Foundation with The Right Hon. Margaret McCain and is at the forefront of Women Moving Millions, a monumental leap forward in philanthropy for women.

Click here to read excerpts from her speech

Click here to view full sized Thank You ad

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The Rt. Honourable Madame Justice Beverley McLachlin, PC, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada
2007 Dinner Theme “Respecting Our Children: The Law Takes Note”

Beverley McLachlin - 2007
Beverley McLachlin - 2007

Beverley McLachlin was born and raised in Southern Alberta, Canada. She attended the University of Alberta at Edmonton, where she earned a B.A. (Hon.) and M.A. in Philosophy (1964) and a Bachelor of Laws degree (1968). Chief Justice McLachlin articled in Edmonton and practiced law in Edmonton, Fort St. John and Vancouver from 1968 to 1971. She taught at the Faculty of Law of the University of British Columbia from 1975 to 1981.

In 1981 Chief Justice McLachlin was appointed to the County Court of Vancouver. She was elevated to the Supreme Court of British Columbia later that year and to the Court of Appeal of British Columbia in 1986. In 1988 she became Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of British Columbia, where she served until her appointment to the Supreme Court of Canada in 1989. On January 7, 2000, she became Chief Justice of Canada.

Chief Justice McLachlin has authored numerous publications. Her hobbies include music, cooking, gardening and walking with her Labrador Retriever. Her first husband, Roderick A. McLachlin passed away in 1988. In 1992 she married Frank McArdle. She has one son, Angus, by her first marriage.

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Kim Pittaway
2005 Dinner Theme “The Power of Sharing Stories – Breaking the Cycle of Family Violence”

Kim Pittaway - 2005
Kim Pittaway - 2005

Kim Pittaway, is a renowned magazine journalist and editor. Born and raised in Moncton, New Brunswick, Kim earned a bachelor of journalism at Carleton University in Ottawa in 1986, and then moved to Toronto where she started her career as a freelance writer and editor for such publications as Chatelaine, Canadian Living, Homemaker’s and others.

Kim has written numerous articles on subjects ranging from depression to premature babies to body image. Her columns are thoughtful, witty and often surprising.

In 2004, Kim moved into the position of editor-in-chief at Chatelaine, where she continued her commitment to sharing women’s stories and strengths on the pages of the magazine. She has since left Chatelaine but continues her work as a writer and editor committed to women’s issues. Kim’s connection to the dinner theme is a personal one: she has written about her own experience as the victim of child sexual abuse by a non-relative and is a strong advocate on behalf of victims and survivors. Her experience is sure to provide insight into the world of child sexual abuse, which is most often clouded by secrecy.

Quote: “Shame is the locked door behind which family violence thrives. Sharing the truth about abuse is the key to unlocking that door: the truth through statistics and research, but also the truth of the individual stories of those who have been victimized. And that’s where the work of the Muriel McQueen Fergusson Foundation has been so essential: in opening the door to truth. The Foundation’s support of research into this area has been fundamental to convincing government and funders that family violence costs all of us: as a community, as businesses, as families, as schools, as institutions. But the hard costs-in healthcare dollars, lost work time, social and educational costs-pale beside the costs to the human spirit, that steady erosion of personhood and loss of human potential that happens as victims come to believe that they are the ones to blame for their abuse. And here too, the Foundation has had an impact, in helping community-based groups reach out to those victims and to the communities around them, in helping to foster strength within communities so that victims are able to share their stories and trust that they will not be shamed again into silence.

A remarkable strength comes from breaking that silence, from stepping forward to tell a story you once thought was so shameful that the burden of it threatened to kill you with its weight. When I speak to women who have been victims of violence, I am amazed at how their stories so often start in a whisper and end in a shout: from a whisper of shame to a voice raised in confidence, in strength, in testament to their incredible will to survive what they once thought was unsurvivable. And the support of the Muriel McQueen Fergusson Foundation and the groups it helps is like a microphone, transmitting that shout so that it is heard and echoed and encouraged well beyond the boundaries of this province.

It’s work the Foundation has every right to be proud of, work the people of the province of New Brunswick have every right to be proud of supporting-work that is saving lives, one whispered voice at a time.”

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Sally Armstrong
2003 Dinner Theme “Human Rights – Human Wrongs: A Global Perspective”

Sally Armstrong - 2003
Sally Armstrong - 2003

Sally Armstrong is editor-at-large for Chatelaine Magazine and a contributing editorat Maclean’s Magazine. She was editor in chief of Homemaker’s from 1988-1999 and was one of the founding editors at Canadian Living.

In addition to Sally’s editorial accomplishments, she has produced several documentaries for television.

Sally will be addressing our gathering with her observations and comment about the human rights situation in countries around the world.

Recently named as UNICEF’s Special Representative to Afghanistan, she has had an insider’s view of the terror and abuse of Human rights in that country. Based upon numerous visits and research on the country, Sally authored a book, “Veiled Threat: The Hidden Power of the Women of Afghanistan” and produced a television documentary entitled, “Daughters or Afghanistan”.

Sally Armstrong is a member of the Order of Canada and a recipient of an Honourary Doctor of Laws and an Honourary Doctor of Letters.

Quote: “It's been said that hope is the oxygen of the human spirit. Certainly when it comes to the task of ending family violence, it's HOPE that has propelled the Muriel McQueen Fergusson Foundation to take on the family secret called violence that used to exist behind closed doors. Hope and a lot of excellent research and hard work has resulted in exposing the facts and blazing a hot spotlight on this scourge to the health and well being of families.

Their success has created a ripple effect - one small group reaching out to others, empowering the people of this province to make change. And that ripple effect is reaching around the world. People often ask me what it's like for women and girls in the war zones where I work as a journalist. I can tell you what happens to them - they are raped, beaten, starved, killed and held for ransom - mostly by their own families and neighbours. It's the New Brunswick example that's helping women in countries like Afghanistan to know that each little group of people creates a butterfly effect. When the Foundation flapped its wings here, the effect was felt all over the province. Now the effect is being felt around the world.

The people of New Brunswick have a lot to be proud of in their struggle to end family violence. And make no mistake, this is a war we're winning.”

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Pamela Wallin
2002 Dinner Theme “Family Violence: Sharing Responsibility”

Pamela Wallin – 2002
Pamela Wallin – 2002

The career of Saskatchewan-born journalist Pamela Wallin has spanned more than twenty-five years and several continents. She began her career as a social worker at the Prince Albert Penitentiary in Saskatchewan before making the transition to journalism, first as a host for CBC Radio and then as a producer in both radio and television.

Her work has included the highly acclaimed Patrick Watson/Laurier LaPierre hour on Sunday Morning and As It Happens, where she was national political producer. In 1985 Pamela Wallin became the first woman in Canadian network television history to be appointed Ottawa Bureau Chief with CTV.

In 1995, she established her own independent production company, producing and hosting award-winning programs such as Pamela Wallin, Pamela Wallin & Company, Heroes and Maclean’s TV.

Her newest book, Speaking of Success: Collected Wisdom, Insights and Reflections, shares the perspectives of many of the celebrated and successful people she has interviewed over the years. The result is an illuminating tour of the human condition as seen through the eyes of one of Canada’s most entertaining and thought-provoking journalists.

With her background as a social worker, Pamela’s message, “Speaking of Success,” will provide an illuminating tour of the human condition. Pamela will weave a message as to how society and technology are intertwined, and how the success of one greatly impacts the other.

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Cynthia Trudell
2000 Dinner Theme “Creating a Family Friendly Corporation”

Cynthia Trudell – 2000
Cynthia Trudell – 2000

New Brunswick-born Cynthia M. Trudell is the first woman to head a major U.S. automobile company. She was elected Vice-President of General Motors and Chairman and President of Saturn Corporation, a wholly-owned GM operation in Luton, England, that produced the Frontera sport-utility vehicle for Europe.

She began her career in 1979 with the Ford Motor Co. in Windsor, Canada as a chemical process engineer. In 1981, she joined GM at the Windsor Transmission Plant as a senior engineer supervisor, and later was named superintendent of Manufacturing.

Cynthia was appointed manufacturing Engineering manager at the Willow Run Transmission complex in Ypsilanti, Michigan in 1987, and in 1989 she became Operations Manager, responsible for the manufacture and assembly of transmission products. In 1992 she was appointed Site Manager, Engine and Foundry Operations, St. Catherines, Ontario. Following this assignment, Cynthia was named plant manager of the Wilmington Assembly Venter in Wilmington, Delaware.

Earning a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia in 1974, Cynthia went on to complete her doctorate in physical chemistry at the University of Windsor, Ontario in 1978. She is a member of the PepsiCo Board of Directors. Cynthia, her husband and their two children live in Tennessee

Quote: “Saturn and the Muriel McQueen Fergusson Foundation share a common faith in “The Power of Partnership.” The Foundation’s slogan, “Joining Together for Answers,” reflects this belief that, collectively, we can accomplish so much more than by acting alone. True partnerships are put to the test continuously, but they can survive and thrive if they are based on mutual respect and commitment to shared values.”

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Annette Verschuren
1999 Dinner Theme “Homecoming - A Celebration of Family”

Annette Verschuren – 1999
Annette Verschuren – 1999

Annette graduated from St. Francis Xavier University in 1977 with a Bachelor of Business Administration. After graduation Annette began her career at the Canada Development Investment Corporation, where she held various positions including Executive Vice President.

In 1983, Annette joined Imasco Ltd. As Vice President, Corporate Development, and held this position until 1986. Between 1989 and 1992, she was President of Verschuren Ventures and between 1993 and 1996 Annette was President of Michaels of Canada Inc.

In 1996, at the age of 39, Annette Verschuren became President of Home Depot Canada, a position that she currently holds. Ms.Verschuren is a Board Member of Sobey’s Inc., the Board of Regents of Mount Allison University, the Retail Council of Canada, and Habitat for Humanity Canada.

Annette was honoured with a Canada 125 Medal in 1992, a Women on the Move Award in 1994 and received an Honourary PhD from Mount Allison University in 1996.

Quote: “I focus not on my abilities but on my opportunities and the recognition that I have no boundaries. I work hard to serve and provide sound judgment and direction to the people I work with.”

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Artwork

2009 "Mentor and Advocate" Muriel Bell

2007 “Illuminator” Muriel Bell

2005 “Childhood” Herzl Kashetsky

2003 “The Butterfly Effect” Carolyn Purdy

2002 Yvette Bourque

2000 “Sue Anonymous Series” Lois Wilby-Hooper

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2009 - "Mentor and Advocate" Muriel Bell
2009 Dinner Theme “Following in Muriel's Footsteps: Driving Social Change”

2007 - “Illuminator” Muriel Bell
2009 - “Mentor and Advocate” Muriel Bell

Muriel Bell was born in Kenora, Ontario. Graduating from the Ontario College of Art in Toronto in 1964, she was then employed in New Brunswick as staff designer in government and private business until 1978, working in residential and corporate interior design and decoration, and detailing early New Brunswick furnishings for historical records.

In 1978 Muriel began painting in a non-commercial venue, then engaged in numerous solo and group exhibitions. She uses a wide range of mixed media techniques as well as traditional methods. The death of her eighteen year old son, to cancer, in 1993, has deeply influenced the nature of her work. Currently represented by Gallery 78 in Fredericton, Muriel Bell's work is included in the permanent collections of the University of New Brunswick, CFB Gagetown, the New Brunswick Art bank, Beaverbrook Art Gallery, St. Thomas University Third Age Centre, and the Province of New Brunswick.

“Creativity is the flow of life” Bell says. In listening deeply to one's intuitive nature, one finds strength of expression, of spirit. She calls her work, both abstract and representational, her spiritual vocabulary.

The Muriel McQueen Fergusson artworks were completed as part of her solo exhibition about older adults: A Time of Our Lives. Opening at UNB Art Centre in Fredericton, it traveled to Ward-Chipman Library and Gallery at UNBSJ, then The Andrew and Laura McCain Gallery in Florenceville.

The portrait of Senator Fergusson was created from the only photograph Bell had taken on the day of the interview with Fergusson. Providentially, it was a photograph of an eloquent subject. In her concentration on other aspects of the interview, Bell had forgotten to check her camera and found herself with one frame left and no flash.

Muriel Bell found Muriel McQueen Fergusson to have a cogent presence. She was gracious, sharp minded, tenacious, direct, small in stature, modest, and resolute. During the meeting, Senator Fergusson generously gave her time and attention to answering questions about her life and her accomplished career. Their conversation left Muriel Bell compelled to know more about the extent of her achievements: determined that a portrait of this great lady should be accompanied by an additional tribute to her life's work.

Bell was granted permission, by Senator Muriel McQueen Fergusson, to open biographical files which were to be sealed until her death, at the New Brunswick Provincial Archives. Bell was overwhelmed with the extent of Senator Fergusson's influence, involvement and commitment as she became immersed in the files. In response to what she saw and felt, Bell used uncluttered sensitive line to convey truth and strength. She created the portrait: Mentor and Advocate and the inspirational piece Illuminator: Justice and Women's Initiative, which the Foundation affectionately calls Muriel's Mission.

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2007 - “Illuminator” – Muriel Bell
2007 Dinner Theme “Respecting Our Children: The Law Takes Note”

2007 - “Illuminator” Muriel Bell
2007 - “Illuminator” Muriel Bell

Muriel Bell was born in Kenora, Ontario. Graduating from the Ontario College of Art in Toronto in 1964, she was then employed in New Brunswick as staff designer in government and private business until 1978, working in residential and corporate interior design and decoration, and detailing early New Brunswick furnishings for historical records.

In 1978 Muriel began painting in a non-commercial venue, then engaged in numerous solo and group exhibitions. She uses a wide range of mixed media techniques as well as traditional methods. The death of her eighteen year old son, to cancer, in 1993, has deeply influenced the nature of her work. Currently represented by Gallery 78 in Fredericton, Muriel Bell’s work is included in the permanent collections of the University of New Brunswick, CFB Gagetown, the New Brunswick Art bank, Beaverbrook Art Gallery, St. Thomas University Third Age Centre, and the Province of New Brunswick.

“Creativity is the flow of life” Bell says. In listening deeply to one’s intuitive nature, one finds strength of expression, of spirit. She calls her work, both abstract and representational, her spiritual vocabulary.

The Muriel McQueen Fergusson artworks were completed as part of her solo exhibition about older adults: A Time of Our Lives. Opening at UNB Art Centre in Fredericton, it traveled to Ward-Chipman Library and Gallery at UNBSJ, then The Andrew and Laura McCain Gallery in Florenceville.

The portrait of Senator Fergusson was created from the only photograph Bell had taken on the day of the interview with Fergusson. Providentially, it was a photograph of an eloquent subject. In her concentration on other aspects of the interview, Bell had forgotten to check her camera and found herself with one frame left and no flash.

Muriel Bell found Muriel McQueen Fergusson to have a cogent presence. She was gracious, sharp minded, tenacious, direct, small in stature, modest, and resolute. During the meeting, Senator Fergusson generously gave her time and attention to answering questions about her life and her accomplished career. Their conversation left Muriel Bell compelled to know more about the extent of her achievements: determined that a portrait of this great lady should be accompanied by an additional tribute to her life’s work.

Bell was granted permission, by Senator Muriel McQueen Fergusson, to open biographical files which were to be sealed until her death, at the New Brunswick Provincial Archives. Bell was overwhelmed with the extent of Senator Fergusson’s influence, involvement and commitment as she became immersed in the files. In response to what she saw and felt, Bell used uncluttered sensitive line to convey truth and strength. She created the portrait: Mentor and Advocate and the inspirational piece Illuminator: Justice and Women’s Initiative, which the Foundation affectionately calls Muriel’s Mission.

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2005 - “Childhood” – Herzl Kashetsky
2005 Dinner Theme “The Power of Sharing Stories – Breaking the Cycle of Family Violence”

2005 - “Childhood” – Herzl Kashetsky
2005 - “Childhood”
Herzl Kashetsky

Herzl Kashetsky received a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree with distinction from Concordia University, Montreal and shortly afterwards spent three months in independent study in Florence and Rome, Italy.

A professional painter for the past 33 years, whose work is found in private, corporate and public collections across Canada Herzl, has exhibited regionally, nationally and internationally. Recognized for his artistic achievements and contributions to the community, Mr. Kashetsky has received the Canada 125 Commemorative Medal, an Honourary Doctorate from the University of New Brunswick, and The Canadian Red Cross Humanitarian Award.

Mr. Kashetsky was a member of the Saint John Art Advisory Board for 12 years and a present member of the Exhibition Committee of The Beaverbrook Art Gallery. His work has been the subject of two video documentaries, Portraits of the Maritimes; Herzl Kashetsky, 1986 by CBC Television and A prayer for The Dead, an exhibition documentary, 1997, by Cable TV, NBM and Jewish Historical Museum.

Commissioned portraits have included: Presidential Portrait, Acadia University 2003/ President, Ganong Bros., St. Stephen, 2002/ Vice-President UNBSJ, 2000/ The Lieutenant Governor of N.B., Legislative Building, 1996.

Everything is a potential subject under the scrutiny of his brush; from a leaf to a landscape, from a brick to a building, or from a word to a portrait. Although the medium may vary as well as the degree of realism, the work has always been “figurative”, that is, representational of the real world.

A particular style of drawing using the written word has been a Kashetsky trademark since the 1970’s. In the drawing “Childhood”, we see a specific portrait of our guest speaker as a young child, where the image, based on a family photograph, is composed from selections of her own writing as an adult, as well as from an article about her. Words are transformed into line and shade creating hair and flesh, as the portrait of a little girl.

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2003 - “The Butterfly Effect” - Carolyn Purdy
2003 Dinner Theme “Human Rights – Human Wrongs: A Global Perspective”

2003 “The Butterfly Effect” Carolyn Purdy
2003 “The Butterfly Effect”
Carolyn Purdy

Born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Carolyn’s artistic senses were developed at an early age. Her mother, an artist who studied under the Group of Seven’s Lemoine Fitzgerald, created in the family home an environment of creativity and an appreciation of the arts. Carolyn studied Art History and French at the University of Manitoba and subsequently spent five years in Switzerland and England. After her return to Canada she taught French in the Halifax area and since moving to Fredericton in the mid eighties has developed her artistic abilities guided by local artists and by attending workshops abroad.

Her work depicts what is familiar but as seen though her eyes only; her imagination being her guide. With bold use of colour and line she draws the viewer into the painting be it a bouquet of flowers, a cozy interior or a crowded afternoon at the local pub.

She describes her work as a “celebration of the joy of life.” Her work has been shown in both solo and group exhibitions and can be found in collections both locally and across Canada.

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Yvette Bourque
2000 Dinner Theme “Creating a Family Friendly Corporation”

Born in the Memramcook Valley in southeastern New Brunswick, Yvette Bourque showed a great interest in drawing from an early age. Having always had a love for the human face with its multitudes of expressions, emotions and feelings, Yvette has concentrated her work mostly in portrait work and mask-making. Through materials such as paper, leather, clay and plaster, she creates masks that can be haunting, gentle and beautiful in their grotesque expressions. Her work is part of many private collections from Newfoundland to California, as well as in Paris and London.

Family Violence: Sharing Responsibility
The use of masks in the décor for this event is meant to remind all of us that we need to stop hiding behind a façade and begin sharing responsibility to expose family violence.

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“Sue Anonymous Series” – Lois Wilby-Hooper Dinner
2000 Dinner Theme “Creating a Family Friendly Corporation”

2000 - “Sue Anonymous Series” – Lois Wilby-Hooper
2000 - “Sue Anonymous Series”
Lois Wilby-Hooper

Lois Wilby-Hooper has taught and practiced fiber arts for years, for the City of Saint John and as a member of the Kennebecasis Valley Quilting Guild, the Charlotte County Quilt Guild and the Canadian Quilters’ Association. Her main interest is in original contemporary designs reflecting the landscapes and life of the Bay of Fundy area. Lois was featured in the book “Quiltworks Across Canada” as one of ten contemporary quilt artists.

Sue Anonymous Series
  • Don’t Make Waves – Sunbonnet Sue struggles in a rising sea of abuse and violence. She is sinking far from shore and help, bound by the adage, “Don’t make waves.”
  • Down and Down – Down and down Sue goes into the dizzying black void. Mental abuse drains her hope, deadens her spirit, until she is entrapped in a grey prison everywhere.
  • Sue Anonymous – What does anonymous little Sue’s sunbonnet conceal? Sagging hearts dissolve into pain, jeweled drops of blood against a bruised background.
  • Now you don’t have me – Like a tee awakening from winter, Sue can find new life. Her declaration, “Now you don’t have me” is the beginning, shown by the outline of Sue’s sunbonnet in the trees.

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